Interplay between mast cells and hormones: Part 5 of 8

Hormone Location released Major functions Interaction with mast cells Reference
Inhibin Testes, ovaries, placenta, pituitary Inhibits production of FSH No known interaction with mast cells
Insulin Pancreas Promotes transfer of glucose from blood to liver and muscle

Promotes production of glycogen in liver

Promotes liberation of glucose stores in liver

Increases growth and survival of mast cells

Increases degranulation and mediator release

Lessmann E, et al. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 promote mast cell survival via activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway. Experimental Hematology 2006: 34(11), 1532-1541.
Insulin like growth factor Liver Modulates cell growth and development

Behaves like insulin

Increases growth and survival of mast cells

Increases degranulation and mediator release

Lessmann E, et al. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 promote mast cell survival via activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase pathway. Experimental Hematology 2006: 34(11), 1532-1541.
Leptin Adipose tissue Decrease of appetite Activates inflammatory cells and T cell responses

Increases production of TNF, IL-2 and IL-6

Decreases mediator production due to activation of IgE receptor

Suppresses secretion of ghrelin

Taildeman J, et al. Human mast cells express leptin and leptin receptors. Histochem Cell Biol 2009: 131(6), 703-711.
Luteinizing hormone (LH) Pituitary Stimulates ovulation and formation of corpus luteum

Stimulates testosterone production

Histamine decreases LH release by acting at H1 receptor.

Histamine increases release of luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), also by acting at H1 receptor.

Miayke A, et al. Involvement of H1 histamine receptor in basal and estrogen-stimulated luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone secretion in rats in vitro. Neuroendocrinology 1987: 45(3), 191-196.

Pontiroli AE, et al. The effect of histamine and H1 and H2 receptors on prolactin and luteinizing hormone release in humans: sex differences and the role of stress. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1981: 52(5), 924-928.

Melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) Pituitary Stimulates melanin production and release

Increases during pregnancy

MSH can induce apoptosis in mast cells

Dose dependent increase in histamine relief, but not in IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TGFb or TNF

Sarkar A, et al. alpha-Melanocyte-stimulating hormone induces cell death in mast cells: involvement of NF-kappaB. FEBS Lett 2003: 549(1-3), 87-93.

Grutzkau A, et al. alpha-Melanocyte stimulating hormone acts as a selective inducer of secretory functions in human mast cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 2000: 278(1), 14-19.

Melatonin Pineal gland, immune system Induces sleep and lowers body temperature Mast cells produce and release melatonin regardless of activation state Maldonado MD, et al. Evidence of melatonin synthesis and release by mast cells. Possible modulatory role on inflammation. Pharmacol Res 2010: 62(3), 282-287.

 

5 Responses

  1. becca July 7, 2016 / 8:39 am

    These may prove among your most useful posts in the long run. Yet for a lay person they are impossible to digest. It’s too tempting to hit on a term and say, ah-hah, so that’s what’s wrong with my … fill in the blank. I’m among those who hope that when I pass along some of the information to m.d’s who are willing to learn, it may lead to palliation.
    Thank you for treating the material and your readers with respect.
    Becca

  2. Julie Wilkinson July 8, 2016 / 10:07 am

    Your clear and specific information was SO helpful and comforting to me as I was helping a family member with a health crisis. Thank you.

  3. madlyn July 9, 2016 / 9:43 pm

    So, I am not overly intelligent and sometimes get very confused by what I read. I just read this statement:
    “We also report that the necessary machinery to synthesize melatonin is present in mast cells and that these cells showed the presence of MT1 and MT2 melatonin membrane receptors. Those results indicated that the melatonin would be able to exert a regulatory effect on inflammatory reactions mediated by mast cells.”
    Does this mean that melatonin intake would inhibit or slow inflammation caused by overactive mast cells in the body? If this is a Really dumb question please do not publish! https://www.researchgate.net/publication/40450040_Evidence_of_melatonin_synthesis_and_release_by_mast_cells_Possible_modulatory_role_on_inflammation

    • Lisa Klimas July 10, 2016 / 1:44 am

      This is in no way a stupid question. You are correct in reading this that melatonin can help to regulate mast cell driven inflammation. However, how these molecules function in different parts of the body can make it hard to achieve the same result by taking a medication or supplement orally. I am not aware of any data showing that taking melatonin supplements decreases mast cell inflammation but that doesn’t mean there isn’t any. Writing this series has been really funny because it forces me to look at all of these links that I had never even considered before. I’ll add “effect of oral melatonin on mast cells” to my research topics list. Melatonin is used by some mast cell patients safely, but be cautious that melatonin can interact with autoimmune disease states, triggering flares. This especially happens in patients with RA.

  4. becca July 10, 2016 / 8:43 am

    re: oral Melatonin etc. More work for the Mast Master:
    Tryptophan is a precusor both of melatonin and of serotonin, and so taking it in the form of 5-HTP supplements (see Examine.com: Independent Analysis on Supplements & Nutrition
    https://examine.com/) will give other variables.
    SSRI’s for pain relief or energy prove intolerable to me, but 5-HTP works; could the melatonin issue be similar for for people who cannot use oral melatonin safely, that is, by getting their bodies to produce their own?

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